Tuesday Tech Tips: Google-licious

Posted by: on May 17, 2011 | 7 Comments

The boys and girls over in Google land have been busy these days, so I thought I would round up some of the more recent events for you all.

Are you a Gmail Label freak? Wish you could create labels longer than 40 characters? Good news!  You can now create label names as long as 225 characters.  Why you would want to create label names longer than 40 characters is a mystery to me but hey, who I am to judge.  Head on over to the Gmail blog for more information on Long Label names in Gmail.

Samsung-ChromebookDo you want the ease of use of a tablet computer such as an iPad or Android tablet and the form factor of a laptop or netbook? Might I suggest then the Chromebook?  Samsung and Acer are the first production partners and promise that the Chromebook will last a full day of use on a single charge and boot up in 8 seconds.  Sounds too good to be true?  The Google Blog has a couple of videos to get you up-to-speed on the new Chromebook so you can decide for yourself if a Chromebook is right for you!

I don’t know what took so long but FINALLY you can color code your Google Calendar events.  I’m seriously happy about this one.  The Gmail blog says: “This has been a feature request from many of you for some time, and we hope you enjoy using it as much as we do.” Well duh, but we love you anyway Google.

Didn’t make it to the Google I/O Developers conference?  Yeah, me neither. Don’t fret as Google has now posted the Keynotes and Session videos.  Don’t look for them on Facebook but you can find the roundup of video links on the official Google Blog.

And finally 10 tips and tricks for Microsoft Word.  Oops, wrong blog post. Microsoft Word tips  will have to wait for another day. See you soon.

7 Comments

  1. Trish McFarlane
    May 17, 2011

    Love them, as usual. I hadn’t heard of Chromebook so will definitely check that out. Also, thanks for the Google App info on Tweetdeck earlier this week! Great stuff.

    Reply
    • Michael Krupa
      May 17, 2011

      Trish – It might be perfect for you since you like to do stuff on the web instead of installing and maintaining apps on the computer.

      Reply
  2. Jake
    May 17, 2011

    Minor quibble :) Chromebooks shouldn’t really be compared to touch devices; they’re simply browserbooks, to coin a term. Take your web browser, or upgrade it if you’re not using Chome :), and there you go. No local storage or anti-virus, no OS updates, nothing but web content. Chrome OS does support attaching devices like cameras, but otherwise, the browser is sandboxed to protect you from viruses, etc.

    Interesting idea, we’ll see how it goes. I can let you kick the tires when I get my Chromebook in June.

    Reply
    • Michael Krupa
      May 17, 2011

      Jake – It’s hard to get across in one sentence the point I was trying to make. While you can’t directly compare touch and non-touch devices, some (but not all) tablets share a simplicity of use with a Chromebook. I know a lot of people who bought an iPad just to browse the web, read their email and online books. They wanted something easy to use, no BSODs or weekly patches to install. For those people specifically wanting a touch device then you are correct, the Chromebook doesn’t fit the bill. Can’t wait to kick the tires!

      Reply
  3. Jake
    May 17, 2011

    Sure, but two of your three use cases require native apps :) I suppose you could normalize the two with Chrome Web Store, which “installs” a web app, loosely defining the word install there.

    The main point is that a Chromebook only provides web apps, which preserves its security. Supposedly.

    Reply
    • Michael Krupa
      May 17, 2011

      I can read my email using Gmail on the Web (it’s even optimized for the iPad) and Amazon has a Web Based Kindle reader in Beta. The Chrome Web Store does blur the lines a bit but might be a good comprise between an installed app and a Web only app. Yes the security aspect is a selling point. Time will tell if Google got it right.

      Reply
  4. Jake
    May 17, 2011

    Come on dude, Trish said above she hadn’t heard of Chromebooks yet. I’m pretty sure that Amazon’s Kindle web reader isn’t a widely known and used way to read books.

    And email? Mail app and iBooks, end of story. Just because people can, doesn’t mean they do.

    Reply

Leave a Reply